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Showing posts from November, 2010

Pick of the Crop 2010 Films

I am an NRI, translated into: no-real Indian.I follow Indian cinema in my quest to find only one million original films before humanity as we know it disappears.I will use the term Indian cinema sparingly because I only have access to Hindi films, not Bengali, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, Marathi, Kannada, Gujarati and other languages.
Film of the year 2010 picks – My Take FILM PRODUCERS QUOTABLE QUOTE My Name is Khan Dharma Productions Fox Star Studio Fox Searchlight Pictures Red Chillies Entertainment “My name is Khan.I’m not a terrorist,” says Khan. Raavan Madras Talkies “If you wander in the sun, you’ll have the same colour as us.Black.” Beera to Ragini. Paa A.B. Corporation Sunil Manchanda “Do you want this baby or not?” Vidya’s mother to her daughter. Endhiran Sun Pictures “I want to live.I love Sana,’ says Chitti the robot to Vasi.

The Village Aakrosh and Swades

I am an NRI, translated into: no-real Indian.  I follow Indian cinema in my quest to find only one million original films before humanity as we know it disappears.  I will use the term Indian cinema sparingly because I only have access to Hindi films, not Malayalam, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Konkani, Nepali, Khasi, Dogri, Garo and other languages.
Aakrosh, directed by Priyadarshan had a scene where Dalits packed their belonging and left the village, which is ruled by Ajatshatru Singh (Paresh Rawal) the corrupt policeman and his friends.  That is no fiction.  Thousands of people leave their villages in India, China, Africa and all over the world to either go to the cities or other countries.
Reasons Reasons for leaving depend on the individual, but it could also be to escape suffocating village norms.  There is a wrong assumption that villages are models of tranquillity, everybody loves another and there is no crime.
There is a lot, mostly crime against women.  Geeta, (Bipashu Basu) was in love w…

Gurinder Chadha After Life Review

I am an NRI, translated into: no-real Indian. I follow Indian cinema in my quest to find only one million original films before humanity as we know it disappears. I will use the term Indian cinema sparingly because I only have access to Hindi films, not Bengali, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, Marathi, Kannada, Gujarati and other languages.

Depression time! I screened It’s a Wonderful After Life, directed by Gurinder Chadha. I bought a ticket and popcorn because I try to follow Shabana Azmi around. She was just spectacular in Umrao Jaan as the madam in a house of song and sin. Big mistake! I found myself looking at a story that is responsible for my flight from Hollywood.

I screen Indian movies because I cannot bear to see another Hollywood story about who done it, police officers who are under pressure from their bosses, a car that is parked outside tapping conservation from a police officer who has a wire, an interrogation room etc. What happened to human beings’ capacity to think, and come u…

Aakrosh A Director's Pain

In the hurry to see how actors deliver their lines, we forget the director’s pain. Tyler Perry, Nandita Das, Mani Ratnam, Vipul Amrutlal, Karan Johar, Ashutosh Gowariker etc. have all made films in frustration about the state of the world and their countries in particular.

Tyler Perry’s pain is obvious in Daddy’s Little Girls where drug lords sell drugs to school children. Nandita Das explores the pain of ordinary people, both Hindus and Muslims in Firaaq. Mani Ratnam bleeds in Ravaan for class systems that divide his people. Anil Sharma explores how ordinary people get caught in the middle in India-Pakistan relationships in his war film, Ab Tumhare Hawale Watan Sathiyo.

Karan Johar looks at how Americans of Indian origin were treated after 9/11 the bombing of the World Trade Centre in the film, My Name is Khan. Ashutosh Gowariker gives us the historical context of the Muslim-Hindu conflict in India in his sumptuous film Jodhaa Akbar. Aakrosh, directed by Priyadarshan is a recent exa…

Dabangg

I am an NRI, translated into: no-real Indian. I follow Indian cinema in my quest to find only one million original films before humanity as we know it disappears. I will use the term Indian cinema sparingly because I only have access to Hindi films, not Tamil, Malayalam, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Konkani, Nepali, Khasi, Dogri, Garo and other languages.

Dabangg directed by Abhinav Kashyap has some aspects I regard as original, like Mr. Pandey marrying a widow Chulbul’s mother (Dimple Kapadia). I’ve never seen a film where a widow gets married. That is why his mother asks Chulbul to like Mr. Pandey who married her and gave him his name. Baabul is an exception because it is the father-in-law (Amitabh Bachchan) who arranges a marriage for Millie (Rani Mukherjee) after his son’s death.

Salman Khan is Chulbul Pandey a corrupt police inspector who takes bribes from crooks but uses the money to help needy people. He falls in love with Rajjo, played by the beautiful Sonakshi Sinha. She cannot get m…